Homeschooling Kinesthetic Boys in a Sit Still World: Resources for Kinesthetic Learners and Their Mamas

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Resources for Kinesthetic Learners and their Mamas

I have two sons. One is 16, and the other is 4. They are both very busy, very active kinesthetic learners.

In our beginning days of homeschooling, I did what many new homeschool parents do. I tried to recreate school at home. I went to public school. So when we first decided five years ago to make the switch from public school to homeschool, I did the only thing I knew to do. . . buy textbooks, make the kids sit during “school” hours, and have a schedule.

It didn’t take long to figure out that school at home wasn’t going to work. At first I thought I was the problem. . . maybe I wasn’t cut out to be a homeschool mom. Being the reader that I am, I searched for a book that could help. I read about different types of curriculum and learning styles. Two of the most highly recommended books I could find on the subject of  learning styles was The Way They Learn and the closely related The 5 Love Languages of Children. Believe it or not, there is a huge link between love languages and learning styles.

Once I realized that my son was a kinesthetic learner, I knew that our textbook style homeschool would have to change. After more searching and trial and error, we were able to find some great resources for kinesthetic learners. It took me a good while to put together a list of things that would work for my sons. Below you will find some things that we really enjoyed and were able to keep my busy boys on task and teach them something in the process.

Resources for Kinesthetic Learners

*I have put the recommended grades for each of the products below. But as homeschool mamas we know that number is totally subjective. Because of this I only put an approximate beginning grade. In our experience several of these titles would work for students well into middle school and even high school. *

Math

Janice VanCleave’s Geometry for Every Kid: Easy Activities that Make Learning Geometry Fun(grades 4+)
Janice VanCleave’s Math for Every Kid: Easy Activities that Make Learning Math Fun (grades 3+)

Life of Fred – available for elementary through college-prep!

History/Social Studies

The Mystery of History (all ages) We have used this history curriculum from the beginning. Because of its versatility, I intend to continue to use these until all five of my children graduate.

Janice VanCleave’s Geography for Every Kid: Easy Activities that Make Learning Geography Fun (grades 3+)

Great Colonial American Projects You Can Build Yourself (grades 4+)

Great Medieval Projects You Can Build Yourself (grades 4+)

Great Ancient China Projects You Can Build Yourself (grades 4+)

Great World War II Projects You Can Build Yourself (grades4+)

Language Arts

WordPlay Cafe: Cool Codes, Priceless Punzles & Phantastic Phonetic Phun (grades 4+)

Life of Fred Language Arts – Available for elementary though high school

All About Spelling  from IEW (grades K+)

Science

Fizz, Bubble & Flash!: Element Explorations & Atom Adventures for Hands-On Science Fun! (grades +)
Awesome Ocean Science  (grades 3+)
Keeping Our Earth Green (grades 4+)
Rubber-Band Banjos and a Java Jive Bass: Projects and Activities on the Science of Music and Sound (grades 3+)
Janice VanCleave’s Engineering for Every Kid: Easy Activities That Make Learning Science Fun(grades 4+)
Janice VanCleave’s The Human Body for Every Kid: Easy Activities that Make Learning Science Fun (grades 3+)

Electives

Using Color In Your Art: Choosing Color for Impact & Pizzazz (grades 3+)
Kids Cook!: Fabulous Food for the Whole Family (grades 3+)
The Kids’ Book of Weather Forecasting (grades 3+)

Delight-directed music unit that I put together for my son (grades 9+)

Resources for Parents of Kinesthetic Learners

As far as parenting kinesthetic learners, I’ve not found a more insightful book than Right-Brained Children in a Left-Brained World: Unlocking the Potential of Your ADD Child. While my guys don’t have ADD, this book is amazingly eye opening to how our kinesthetic kids see the world.

Being a boy mom can be difficult. Being a homeschool mom of kinesthetic boys is enough to drive a woman mad. Boys are just a different kind of creature that require a different kind of parenting. Perhaps the most accurate description of a boy I’ve ever heard is this. . .

boy – (n) noise with dirt on it

the-Youngs

 Like most moms, I’ve needed encouragement and inspiration when parenting gets rough. Some of the most practical boy mom help I’ve ever found was in Raising Real Men by Hal and Melanie Young. The book is full of practical and biblical insights for raising our crazy boys into godly young men. It truly is a must-have for parents of boys.

I can’t wait to see them at the 2016 IAHE Home Educator’s Convention here in Indiana! Andrew Pudewa (founder of Institute for Excellence in Writing [IEW]) and Linda Lacour Hobar (creator of The Mystery of History) also be speaking at the convention! This is going to be a big year, and exciting for us because so many of our favorite vendors/speakers will be there!!

Early Bird registration is now open through December 31st. Prices are just $30/individual and $60/family.

Come and meet the IAHE Social Media Team!

We are all excited to meet you and share our love of homeschooling with you.

Shalynne of Wonderfully Chaotic

Jeniffer of Thou Shall Not Whine

Annette of In All You Do

Connie of The Daisyhead

Tawnee of Adventures in Homeschooling

Hillary of Walking Fruitfully

Back to homeschool series

7 thoughts on “Homeschooling Kinesthetic Boys in a Sit Still World: Resources for Kinesthetic Learners and Their Mamas

  1. Pingback: Why We Homeschool?
  2. Great list of resources! I have homeschooled three boys and all three of them were kinesthetic learners to at least some degree. One of the simplest yet effective things we did to help them was to let them sit, stand, lie down, wiggle, jump up and down, clap their hands, or whatever if that helped them to concentrate or remember.

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